Panhandle Plains

October 15, 2013 § 2 Comments

If you want to have breakfast on the road after you leave Lubbock on your way to Amarillo be prepared to drive about 50 miles before you find a place that will serve anything to eat. Mile after mile we saw nothing but flat land, a couple of small towns, cotton gin plants, farm equipment and truck parts garages, grain mills and their railroad, abandoned homes and gas stations.  Hungry and with our eyes fixed towards the roadsides or the seemingly never ending road straight ahead on the horizon, we sat silently, feeling like total strangers in this bleak end of the world. A place where no one goes anywhere or lives for much.

Abernathy, TX, early .morning on main street

Abernathy, TX, early .morning on main street.

Looking for food on Main Street, Abernathy, it felt like we were in a ghost town

Looking for food on Main Street, Abernathy, it felt like we were in a ghost town.

Finally, in the town of Plainview, past New Deal, we saw a couple of fast food signs and stopped at an IHOP. It was chilly, 48 degrees, with a biting wind and still overcast, but warm inside, serving a hot breakfast.

Further along the road, the skies cleared.

Further along the road, the skies cleared.

An hour or so later the sun came out on the plains.  Looking forward to a walk in the fresh air, we went to Palo Duro Canyon State Park near Amarillo.

A flowing creek in Palo Duro Canyon is an ephemeral site.

A flowing creek in Palo Duro Canyon is an ephemeral site.

And tonight we stay at The Big Texan Motel in Amarillo, our last night before Santa Fe and our new home …

A colorful Texas motel,

So different from this morning's world, yet still in Texas.

Texas in Technicolor

A room at Big Texan in Amarillo

complete with a horse hotel,

Horse Hotel

Horses Welcome

A REAL horse hotel!

A restaurant,

Dinner in Amarillo

 

Steak in Texas

Cowboy Dinner

And to top it all off a glorious evening sky…

Glorious evening sky

 

Advertisements

§ 2 Responses to Panhandle Plains

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading Panhandle Plains at Marchand de Couleurs.

meta

%d bloggers like this: